Reading Week #2

May, 2017

So this is the first time that I am posting on a Sunday like I had assumed when I worked out this new schedule. This being the first week i.e the reading week, I didn’t do much of anything else other than read some of the books from my Want to Read shelf on Goodreads. But before I get into that I would like to say that the reason why I did not post anything the last week of April is because I just didn’t feel like I had anything worth sharing, you know? I spent the entire week on my playstation and just generally staring into empty space. Anyways, here are the books I read this week.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, parts one and two
by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage.

I am pretty sure that some of the hardcore Harry Potter Books series’ fans are going to be really disappointed with this, but I personally loved it. First of all, this is a play and so you must not compare it with the previous books and secondly, I am glad that it is. The Harry Potter series had an incredibly sad, melancholy but satisfactory end for me and many others, I do not want another Harry Potter book. So, this was really refreshing to go back to this fantastical, magical world and its quirky characters in a more emotional, dialogue driven and dramatic rendition. This is also possibly the first and only play that I have read so I can’t really compare it with anything but I would say that I did really enjoy it. It was fun to meet, once more, Harry and the rest of the gang, to see them tackle with issues of parenthood, family and work drama and so on. This is a definite must-read for all Harry Potter fans.

Glitch
by Hugh Howey

Glitch

When a robot defies his programming, is he broken? Or is he something else? A short story of 5,000 words.

Artificial intelligence and its boundaries is a topic that is dissected to the bone and in that way their is nothing here of novel value; but Hugh Howey’s incredible writing style, fantastically imaginative work building, incredible characters and intriguing plot did turn this short read into one of my all time favourites. Although it did feel solid and complete when I first read it, after mulling over it a few more days, I can no longer hold back this feeling of wanting more. To have some way of taking a quick peek somehow just to see what happened next. But overall, an Hour well spent.

Gutenberg the Geek
by Jeff Jarvis

Gutenberg the Geek

Johannes Gutenberg was our first geek, the original technology entrepreneur, who had to grapple with all the challenges a Silicon Valley startup faces today. Jeff Jarvis tells Gutenberg’s story from an entrepreneurial perspective, examining how he overcame technology hurdles, how he operated with the secrecy of a Steve Jobs but then shifted to openness, how he raised capital and mitigated risk, and how, in the end, his cash flow and equity structure did him in. This is also the inspiring story of a great disruptor. That is what makes Gutenberg the patron saint of entrepreneurs.

You might have heard of Gutenberg but not necessarily know anything about him. He is basically the man who invented the printing machine a technological marvel that changed the world for the coming centuries. The book is quite informative and such amount of facts from so little a number of pages is always good. Some people scowl at the analogies made to compare Gutenberg’s endeavours to the Silicon Valley startups and him to Steve Jobs; but being a tech person myself I didn’t really mind it as much. I’ll be honest this wasn’t the most well written thing I have read but it was informative, to the point and if you put aside the unnecessary plug to the authors other book at the end it was a fine read overall. If you aren’t that interested in Gutenberg, the IT sector or the technology industry you can skip this one, don’t worry, I won’t tell anyone.

Safety Tips for Living Alone
by Jim Shepard

Safety Tips for Living Alone

In “Safety Tips for Living Alone,” Jim Shepard weaves the stories of four families whose lives are upended when the men go to work on a dangerous and isolated surveillance platform off the coast of Long Island. After working his way up to Captain, career serviceman Gordon Phelan is offered the command of Texas Tower 4—a wobbly “box over the ocean.” Among the team of military personnel and civilians joining Phelan aboard the platform are Roy Bakke, Wilbur Kovarick and Louie Laino, three strong and dutiful men trying to ensure better lives for their families. But when a powerful storm approaches the Tower, the four men—and everyone on board—must face their increasingly probable deaths.

In his introduction, Joshua Ferris writes “There’s no better way to describe the experience of the reader of Shepard’s reimagining of this forgotten, misbegotten episode in American history” than to say one is “moved and appalled.”

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Reading Week #2

Add yours

  1. Its a bit off topic, but since you love reading books and playing videogames, I highly reccomend you to play the Zero Escape franchise(consists of three games: 999, Virtues Last Reward, Zero Time Dillema).This franchise belongs to the Visual Novel genre and this series in particular feels alot like a book, since gameplay is kept to a minimum and the game is very text and story heavy.

    Its one of those stories that can only be told in videogame form.Its available both on PS4 and Steam.As said, it comes highly reccomended!

    Oh, and loved your post by the way.Very well written!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: